Friday Scribblings

Pursuit

 

PURSUIT: Your pursuit of a thing proves your passion for a thing!

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Adventures in Card-Making

How to choose a Valentine card or For better or verse!

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Dear Fellow Crafters,

As a card maker, I seldom shop in Hallmark stores. On occasion, when I am stumped for an idea, I admit it, I do browse the card selection aisle. This post can either appeal to the person who creates cards or the person who doesn’t. In either case, the points I make (hopefully) will benefit you.

Sending the “RIGHT” Valentine card can be stressful, so here are some do’s and don’t’s:

 DO: Trust your own words. Whether or not your valentine is for a friend, a relative or a romantic interest, it’s unlikely that text in a conventional store-bought card can accurately sum up your relationship. Look for a card with blank space. For years I sold my cards from my web site blank inside for that very reason. I now offer sentiments too, but the big “draw” still seems to be, in the words of a client, “leave mine blank”.

 Don’t: Let the card do all the talking – go instead for a personalized message.

DO: Feel free to get creative (artistic skills not required). If you go with a store-bought card, aim for one with text or pictures that have personal significance. For years, my husband has been  plagued with buying cards. He told me that he searches for ones that “say what he wants them to say” and the card is one that is creative. I appreciate his effort and have some  that I can “copy”.

 DON’T: Lean toward overly effusive language, as it runs the risk of making your message seem unoriginal or recycled.

   DO: Incorporate humor, if it suits your relationship. A little humor can also help take some pressure off of Valentine’s Day.

 DON’T: Explore uncharted territory when it comes to jokes. Steer clear of humor that borders on being sexist, racist or otherwise offensive.

 DO: Look for a card with special significance for the relationship. Choose one with writing or illustrations that evoke fond memories, for example. When we were first dating, my husband was stationed overseas. My first Valentine card from him featured a barren tree on the front, and a tree with loads of leaves and hearts on the inside. He hand-wrote the sentiment and yes, I still have that card!

 DON’T: Use the card as an attempt to accelerate or scale back the relationship. Know your boundaries, and don’t use the card has an attempt to test them with large, unprecedented gestures, such as saying “I love you” for the first time. The same rule applies to initiating a breakup or expressing displeasure.

 ALWAYS: Avoid the view that the fate of a relationship is hinging on a single holiday, or a single greeting card, for that matter.

I hope that you have found this useful and if you still have some qualms about what to say in the card, either contact me via email or check out my previous posts on sentiments or my cards.

‘Til next time,

~Sallie

Copyright – 2015 by uniquelyyourscards.com

All rights reserved.

Excerpts and links may be used provided that full and clear credit is given to Sallie and uniquelyyourscards with appropriate and specific direction to the original content. You can reach Sallie at uniquelyyourscards@outlook.com

Adventures in Card-Making

Music in the craft room

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Dear Fellow Crafters,

Right now, check your Kindle, I-Phone or other device and count how many songs/albums you have stored. Do you listen primarily to one or two genres  or are you an eclectic collector? Did you know that music effects your brain?

It turns out that a moderate noise level is the “sweet spot” for creativity. Ambient noise gets our creative juices flowing. When we struggle through a process (how to get a die cut to stand up in a mason jar, for instance) we resort to more create approaches. I used a Styrofoam base cut in half and covered the edges.

Music choices can predict our personality. The five personality traits are openness to experiences, extraversion, agreeableness, conscientiousness, and emotional stability. While I am not sure of this and liken studies I’ve read to the fascination some people have to Horoscopes, it does sound interesting.  My favorite music choices  are country, classic, nature sounds, and sometimes TV or movie themes. For instance, if I need to complete a monotonous task, such as cutting out store coupons, I listen to the music score from the album “Snowy River”, or if I am trying to relax, I listen to “Rudy”. Sometimes listening to soothing music can help you creatively daydream. You slow down your mind and body and drift into your next big project.

So, the next time you enter your studio, decide if you are going to dream or work and play the music that will help your experiences.

‘Til next time,

~Salle

Copyright – 2015 by uniquelyyourscards.com

All rights reserved.

Excerpts and links may be used provided that full and clear credit is given to Sallie and uniquelyyourscards with appropriate and specific direction to the original content. You can reach Sallie at uniquelyyourscards@outlook.com