Memorial Day- Lunch in the park

Dear Fellow Crafters,

The following is a post from one of my contributors “G” from my journal blog. Hope you enjoy it! You can read more of his  posts on uniquelyyourscraftjournal.com

‘Til then,

~Sallie

LUNCH IN THE PARK

Not far from where I work is a pretty little park, set near a lake that was formally the reservoir. Driving by, I said for over a year, that on a nice day I should eat lunch there one day. Only recently I did. I invited Barbie (Joanie) my on again off again lunch partner to join me, but she wimped out.

What a shock I got! In this park is a beautiful concrete and bronze memorial to a WW2 Marine named Frank Wiltez. Maybe I should say MEDAL OF RECEIPIENT Marine. He received it for extremely heroic actions on Guam. It was, as we Marines say “JOHN WAYNE” stuff.

Of course I was overcome with respect for the site, and considered eating somewhere else. I swear to you I heard (in my head) a voice say “Sit down brother Marine. I’d enjoy the company.”

So I sat on a nearby bench and started my sandwich. I journeyed back. I imagined him sitting on a sand berm or in a foxhole eating. Then I remembered my days in Vietnam stopping to eat a hurried meal. Then my mind flashed to our troops in iraq, and about them doing the same thing.

Funny, sometimes the simple act of eating a small meal can take on such significance. You see, in combat, a meal means you’re alive. You made it from one period of day to another. The meal becomes a “respite in the horrors of hell” (Quote from Ernie Pile) It means you may refresh yourself before you return to the horrors of war.

I played out a conversation in my mind. (How it got there I don’t know)

RAY:  FRANK, WHAT WAS IT LIKE ON GUAM?

FRANK: SAME AS IT WAS AT KHESHAN OR BAGHDAD.

RAY: WHERE YOU SCARED?

FRANK: WEREN’T YOU?

RAY: HOW DID YOU DIE?

FRANK: ASK ME WHY INSTEAD

RAY: WHY THEN.

FRANK: BECAUSE LIKE ALL MARINES WHO SERVE IN COMBAT I BELIEVE THAT IF NOTHING IS WORTH DYING FOR, THAN NOTHING IS WORTH LIVING FOR.

RAY: YOU KNOW FRANK, UP UNTIL 3 WEEKS AGO, I WONDERED IF THE YOUNG MARINES OF TODAY WOULD AGREE WITH US! BUT OF COURSE, THEY DO.

FRANK: YEAH, THOSE YOUNG LADS REALLY CAME THOUGH!

RAY: FOOD’S BETTER FOR THESE GUYS TODAY FRANK.

FRANK: YEAH, TELL ME ABOUT IT! HAD LUNCH WITH ONE OF THEM LAST WEEK. THIS BEING DEAD IS SOMETIMES COOL! YOU CAN GO WHEREVER YOU WANT INSTANLY. CHOW LOOKED REALLY GOOD OVER OUR OLD C-RATIONS.

RAY: AFFIRMATIVE ON THAT!

FRANK: WELL RAY, GOT TO GO. THIS CURRENT WAR ON EARTH HAS GOT MY MOM ALL UPSET. SHE’S COMPLAINING TO ST. FRANCIS ABOUT LACK OF PEACE. I’VE GOT TO CALM HER DOWN. BUT THANKS FOR COMING TO MY PARK TO VISIT! COME AGAIN!

RAY: YOU BET FRANK. AND IF YOU SEE MY MOM COULD YOU TELL HER THAT I’M TALKING / E-MAILING 2 MOMS OF LADS OVER THERE NOW, TELLING THEM NOT TO WORRY.

FRANK: FORGET IT! SHE ALREADY KNOWS! THE BOSS HIMSELF TOLD HER! NOW SHE’S WALKING AROUND WEARING THAT MARINE MOM PIN YOU GAVE HER, BORING THE SHIT OUT OF EVERYONE, SAYING: “HOW ‘BOUT THOSE MARINES! MY SON WAS ONE YOU KNOW!”

RAY: THANKS FRANK—- FOR EVERYTHING.

FRANK: SEMPER FI! SEE YOU LATER.

 

 

Tool Tips- Embossing Folders

Tool Tips: Embossing Folders

Dear Fellow Crafters,

Embossing folders have been around for several years now, and the effects they produce seem to never go out of style. These tools are great for card makers because of the ease by which wonderful textures and designs can be added to cards. By simply placing paper in the plastic folder and running it through a machine to apply pressure, the result is a beautiful, raised design. By simply adding some ink to the process, you can have stunning letterpress designs as well.

Letterpress is a paper-craft technique of relief printing where ink is added to a raised design/text and then paper is pressed onto it. The inked design then becomes the portion of the design that is pressed and the raised portion of the design is void of ink. This was the normal form of printing text from the 15th century until the 20th century, when offset printing was developed.

We are seeing a revival of letterpress in many forms as a handmade or small-batch type of specialty craft. This is a technique that you can recreate in your home using embossing folders, ink, paper and a brayer. A brayer is a hard, smooth roller that can have ink applied to it, and then it is used to roll the ink onto the raised portion of the embossing folder.

After you have gathered these supplies, simply roll the brayer over your ink pad and then roll it across the raised portion of the open embossing folder. Lay a piece of cardstock on the inked design, very carefully. It’s very important to make sure the cardstock doesn’t slide around on the ink. You may want to add a small amount of adhesive on the back side of your paper so it will stay in place once you close the embossing folder. Finally, run the embossing folder through an embossing machine such as a Sizzix Big Shot or Provo Craft Cuttlebug. There are many other machines on the market that you can use to place the pressure on the folder to embed the design and ink into your paper.

Finally, open your folder and gently remove the finished product. If you added adhesive to the back of your paper, you may need to use a bit of extra effort to carefully remove the paper. This letterpress image can be added to your card as a bold background, or it can be cut down with scissors, punches or dies, and then added to your card as an embellishment or focal point.

If you already own some embossing folders and don’t have a brayer, try lightly brushing an ink pad across the raised surface of the embossing folder. The key is not to press the ink pad onto the design. You want to keep all the ink on the very top surfaces of the design and not in the valleys. You may have to do a few trial-and-error attempts to figure out just how much ink you need to achieve the perfect result, but the effort is well worth the finished product.

One last tip is to use either a pigment ink, chalk ink or distress ink. These inks will stay wet long enough for you to place your paper and run it through the embossing machine. A dye ink may dry too quickly to transfer the ink to the paper. When you are finished, simply clean the embossing folder with a baby wipe or damp cloth to remove the ink.

‘Til next time,

~Sallie

Mod Podge Antique

Dear Fellow Crafters,

Mod Podge Antique Finish comes in matte and glossy. In either case, the finish produces an heirloom look to the project. The bottle label states that more than 1 coat is required. To obtain a good look of the matte type, some crafters report that 2 heavy coats of the ModPodge is advisable.

The glossy version does the exact same thing but the effect adds a super shiny glass-like finish to your project.

‘Til next time,

~Sallie

Happy Birthday

Dear Fellow Crafters,

 

Happy Birthday wishes to our Granddaughter!

She’s made of sugar and spice and everything nice

Happy Birthday

Happy Birthday

 th-114

 Today is our Granddaughter’s 3rd birthday! I made a card of course and then began to think about what our personal message would be. As you can imagine, I have a large collection of greetings for all occasions  but finding the right sentiment was hard. I did eventually come up with the greeting above but as I did so, I wondered if you my fellow crafters would like some children’s birthday greetings too – so here are some just for you!

Sallie

  •      We hope that when today is all done you can say that your birthday was fun!
  •      You are the star of the day!
  •      You’re the cutest 3-year-old we know!
  •      Making a wish for your birthday!
  •      You deserve a dreams-come-true birthday!