Questions

Ok, I give up! What types of felt can I use?

Dear Fellow Crafters,

Bear in stocking
Bear in stocking

I started using felt to die cut Christmas stockings for my cards but I didn’t know that you could:

stamp on it

create your own felt trim using border dies

use it when paper piercing to add extra dimension.

The best kind of felt to use  depends on what you plan to do with it. If you are looking to create your own embellishments, you’ll want to use wool felt rather than acrylic. Some craft stores sell felt by the sheet or on a roll. Some felt has adhesive which helps enormously. This is the type I used in the card above.

‘Til next time,

~Sallie

Advertisements
Questions

Help! My card is too large for the envelope!!!

Dear Fellow Crafters,

Have you ever had this problem – you’ve made the card and now find that it doesn’t fit the envelope you have? Did you know that you can make your own? Here are the steps and I have a handy reference for the correct paper size you will need below.

  •  Measure your card. Refer to the chart below for the paper size.
  •  Cut your paper to the appropriate square.
  •  Place your card face down in the center of the square, angled to the left. You’ll be creating 4 triangles.
  •  Fold in the side flaps over the back of the card and crease close to the card edges.
  •  Fold up the bottom flap and crease. Use a bone folder for a crisp look.
  •  Carefully glue the bottom to the side edges where they overlap.
  •  Remove your card and write the info on the front of the envelope. Then reinserte your card, put a thin layer of glue stick on the flap sides and fold down and secure.

If your card is:                                                     Then use a:

5 3/4″ x 8 3/4″                                                   11 3/4″ square

6 1/4″ square                                                     9″

5 1/4″ square                                                     8″

5 1/4 x 4″                                                            7 1/4″

5: x 7 1/8″                                                           9 1/2″

3 1/4″ x 5 1/4″                                                     6 3/4″

‘Til next time,

~Sallie

Questions

Ok, I give up! What are Embossing Diffusers?

Reads Fellow Crafters,

What Are Embossing Diffusers?

Embossing diffusers are simply a tool which allow you to get more use out of your embossing folders.  The diffusers are designed to allow you to create sections on your artwork which are not embossed when using an embossing folder.

 

How to Use It

This product is designed to be used with any of the embossing folders available on the market – with the exception of the 5”x7” and larger embossing folders. These can be used with any of the Sizzix line of embossing machines, and from my own experimentation both the Spellbinders Grand Calibur and the PC Cuttlebug.  The sandwich for the PC Cuttlebug is:

    • A plate
    • embossing folder
    • paper
    • diffuser
    • B plate

After some experimentation, I was able to find sandwiches for the Grand Calibur.  Because the Spellbinders embossing folders are thicker than other leading industry embossing folders (thanks to being double-sided), there are two sandwiches.  Feeding through the machine will feel loose, and that is okay, you will still get a good solid impression.  The sandwiches are:

 

For Spellbinders Embossing Folders

    • B plate
    • embossing folder
    • paper
    • diffuser

 

For other industry folders:

    • C plate
    • embossing folder
    • paper
    • diffuser

 

If you have been using embossing folders for a long time, you will notice that embossing diffusers are the industry’s response to a technique in which you use your dies to cut out several pieces of thin chipboard, layer the pieces of chipboard together, and then use them to create the same effect as these fancy diffusers.   Currently the diffusers come in standard shapes of large oval, skinny oval, and circle.  There are no fancy designs offered at the moment, although you can make them with your dies and chipboard.  However, these save you from all the work which goes into making your own, and with a name like “Diffuser Set #1” it is likely more are on their way.  With this three set of diffusers you get six different options – not bad for the MSRP.

Tips and Techniques

In playing around with this product, I found several different ways to use these diffusers.

  1. Use the frame to have an un-embossed center.
  2. Use the center to emboss the center and not the outer section.
  3. Combine both the inner shape and frame with different embossing folders to get two different designs on one sheet of cardstock.
  4. Use the inner shape to create highlights of texture around the cardstock rather than in the center.
  5. Use the diffuser frames to create texture to the base of your journaling and title cards.

While using the center portions of the diffuser sets, I found that they move around a lot.  I fixed this by using some masking tape to hold my embossing folder and diffuser together.  Although this product has the most applicable use for card design, I found myself wanting to use it for scrapbook layouts. Below you can see some of the projects I came up with.

While playing with the embossing diffusers and embossing folders by different companies, I found that the Tim Holtz embossing folders worked best with the diffusers, giving a strong overall impression.  However, these same results could be achieved with including a shim or two with the embossing folders from other leading companies aside from Sizzix.

‘Til next time,

~Sallie

Questions

How do I make shaped cards?

 

Dear Fellow Crafters,

I often find myself getting bored with the same old 5″ x 6 1/2″ shaped card. Oh, there are lots of die cuts and papers out there to cover the size of the blank card but the shape gets boring after a while. So, one day I surfed the web to find out how to make shaped cards. The following are some ideas I found. Enjoy!

‘Til next time,

~Sallie

PS: see part 2 for more in-depth instructions.

Draw or sketch a shape onto your card base using the fold to your shape’s advantage, then cut out, making sure not to cut the fold. You can use clip cart, templates found on-line or rubber stamps. I have Rubbermaid round containers that are perfect for round cards. You can use an old CD also. Then I found that I could use my Sizzix die cut shapes – and I really ‘went to town’ with my larger frame sets and BigZ dies (old Jaloppy, Haunted House and Sleigh). Another suggestion is Stencils and Card Shapes by Paper Flair from Hot off the Press. These are really easy to use! Just trace and cut.

Hang your shape over the edge of the card, for example if your card base is 4.25” x 5.5”, cut your base down to 3” x 5.5” and allow your shape to hang over the 3” side.

Use an image/large stamp, adhere it to your card front, and cut around the shape.

Sources:

Technique Essentials #9 Shaped Cards byJennifer McGuire

Creating a Shaped Card From Pre-CreatedArt

Copyright – 2015  by uniquelyyourscards.com

All rights reserved.

Excerpts and links may be used provided that full and clear credit is given to Sallie and uniquelyyourscards with appropriate and specific direction to the original content. You can reach Sallie at uniquelyyourscards@outlook.com

 

 

Questions

How do I combine paper patterns?

Dear Fellow Crafters,

If you’re like me, you probably have several paper packs from different companies. I have some from DCV (Die Cuts with a View) and some from K and Company. Paper companies change designs every year so it is hard to mix patterns and prints but there are some specific rules:

1. Start with one multi-color print and then pull in subtle patterns that are the same color.

2. Try using different papers with the same print like flowers or polka dots but in varying scales.

3. You can pair papers of the same color together like shades of red.

4. Try mixing similar design elements like circles, stripes and polka dots.

5. Neutral colors work well with pattern papers.

‘Til next time,

~Sallie