Mod Podge · Pursuit of Happiness

Making a change

Dear Fellow Crafters,

You have decided to make a change.

You have been following the same path, making the same type of craft all these years and yet…

You could stay in your comfort zone but you feel a pull in another direction.

You need to challenge yourself.

There’s a show on TV called “A Craftsmen Legacy” which features the host learning age-old crafts like needlework, making soap, creating miniatures, leather tooling etc. Taking a “page” from the show, we’re going to get off our safe and usual crafting path and learn new techniques and discover ourselves in the process.

During May we will tackle reverse foil, lattice die cut and flowers, a new die (I have been dying to try- no pun intended!) and new ModPodge.

See you next month!

~Sallie

Pursuit of Happiness

Card Swap

Dear Fellow Crafters,

We’ve all heard of cookie swaps, right? That’s the event where different participants bake and wrap cookies and then exchange them with their friends. Well, a card swap is pretty much the same thing except that one can learn new techniques or garner New inspiration during the exchange.

Making cards is more fun when you do it with others so here are some tips to get you started:

  • Make a list of people you know who enjoy paper crafting or are willing to learn. Don’t forget teenagers.
  • Decide how many members to have in the group. It’s a good idea to invite 12 or fewer because pre-packaged materials come in sixes or received and besides making more than 12 cards sounds like a chore!
  • In the invitation indicate how many people are going to participate and how many cards and/or supplies to bring.
  • Meet at a restaurant or a member’s home.
  • During the swap take turns teaching a new technique or do a make-and-take. Be sure to keep it simple.
  • If your November/December swap is a success try having another in the spring or create a themed swap (Birthday, wedding, thank-you)
  • Have fun!

Happy crafting,

~Sallie

Perspectives · Pursuit of Happiness

The History of Independence Day

Dear Fellow Crafters,

Here in the United States we celebrate our birthday today! For those of you who are not familiar with our holiday here is an excellent article:

~Sallie

“Taxation without representation!” was the battle cry in America’s 13 Colonies, which were forced to pay taxes to England’s King George III despite having no representation in the British Parliament. As dissatisfaction grew, British troops were sent in to quell the early movement toward rebellion. Repeated attempts by the Colonists to resolve the crisis without military conflict proved fruitless.

On June 11, 1776, the Colonies’ Second Continental Congress met in Philadelphia and formed a committee whose express purpose was drafting a document that would formally sever their ties with Great Britain. The committee included Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Franklin, John Adams, Roger Sherman and Robert R. Livingston. Jefferson, who was considered the strongest and most eloquent writer, crafted the original draft document (as seen above). A total of 86 changes were made to his draft and the Continental Congress officially adopted the final version on July 4, 1776.

The following day, copies of the Declaration of Independence were distributed, and on July 6, The Pennsylvania Evening Post became the first newspaper to print the extraordinary document. The Declaration of Independence has since become our nation’s most cherished symbol of liberty.

Bonfires and Illuminations
On July 8, 1776, the first public readings of the Declaration were held in Philadelphia’s Independence Square to the ringing of bells and band music. One year later, on July 4, 1777, Philadelphia marked Independence Day by adjourning Congress and celebrating with bonfires, bells and fireworks.

The custom eventually spread to other towns, both large and small, where the day was marked with processions, oratory, picnics, contests, games, military displays and fireworks. Observations throughout the nation became even more common at the end of the War of 1812 with Great Britain.

In June of 1826, Thomas Jefferson sent a letter to Roger C. Weightman, declining an invitation to come to Washington, D.C. to help celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Declaration of Independence. It was the last letter that Jefferson, who was gravely ill, ever wrote. In it, Jefferson says of the document:

“May it be to the world, what I believe it will be … the signal of arousing men to burst the chains … and to assume the blessings and security of self-government. That form, which we have substituted, restores the free right to the unbounded exercise of reason and freedom of opinion. All eyes are opened, or opening, to the rights of man. …For ourselves, let the annual return of this day forever refresh our recollections of these rights, and an undiminished devotion to them.”

– Thomas Jefferson
June 24, 1826 Monticello
Congress established Independence Day as a holiday in 1870, and in 1938 Congress reaffirmed it as a paid holiday for federal employees. Today, communities across the nation mark this major midsummer holiday with parades, firework displays, picnics and performances of “The Star-Spangled Banner” and marches by John Philip Sousa.