magazines

Are Newsletters useful?

Dear Fellow Crafters,

Before Pinterest and Facebook came along, there were newsletters and blogs. Most craft magazines offered subscriptions to their newsletters and still do. I subscribe to several myself. It is easy to enroll. You just use your email address and specify when you want to receive the content (immediately, weekly or monthly).

It’s interesting to see what people like to read and how many newsletters there are on the web. One day, just out of curiosity, I typed in “Craft newsletters’ on the search line of my browser and behold over 3,240,000 results popped up!

I like to view newsletters for much of the same reasons why I like Pinterest. Techniques, tips and galleries are all found in newsletters. Depending on the theme, you can find a magazine, newsletter or blog that will enhance your particular hobby.

Here are some favorite newsletters that I subscribe to:

Mod Podge Rocks

Betty Crocker

Country Chic Cottage

Chicken Soup for the Soul

Cardmaker

Hero Arts

 

‘Til next time,

~Sallie

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How I solved _______________

How to pick rubber stamp images

Dear Fellow Crafters,

Years ago, when I was just starting out, I picked images I liked. I never really focused on a particular company (Hero Arts, Stampendous, Penny Black). I just picked out what I liked (as I just said!) I found to my dismay that I really needed to focus on my growing stamp collection. For instance, I had rubber stamps of birthday images but no sentiments, Christmas rubber stamps (snowmen, trees, candy canes) but no Holiday sentiments.  I began an inventory of my collection and that actually helped. I found that I could, in a pinch, make a birthday card with nicely stamped cake on it but I had to type, cut out and paste the sentiment inside the card, ’cause I could not write legibly. I could create a sentiment but could not draw a flower. That’s when organization finally kicked in.

I took a 3 ring binder and gathered dye ink and the stamps, I listed and stamped the image twice once on regular paper and the other on a blank index card. That way, if I needed to pick an image to correctly compliment a sentiment, I had the perfect size of the stamped image. Once I started die-cutting, I could tell which images fit an oval, scallop circle or frame.

I would suggest that a beginner collect birthday, holiday, flower images first, then sentiments. Keep your creative mind open for which images/sentiments are on sale and buy them. You never know when they will come in handy. Case in point: years ago I bought an image of Snoopy (Charlie Brown), used it with the children then forgot about it. This past year, when Charlie Brown’s movie came out, so too did my rubber stamp!

If you have any additional questions about beginning rubber stamping, just email me at uniquelyyourscards@outlook or comment below.

‘Til next time,

~Sallie

Adventures in Card-Making

Question -Shaped cards- Part 2

Dear Fellow Crafters,

There are lots of card designs out there, but if you are getting bored by the straight-edge cards try shaped ones. The following article may help you:

Technique Essentials #9 Shaped Cards
By Jennifer McGuireI love making handmade cards. There is no greater joy than sending a card to a loved one. However, after a few years of sending cards, I was looking for a fun way to be a bit more creative than decorating a plain rectangle card. I started out by making a circle card and loved it! Before I knew it, I was creating cards in every shape, from hearts to flowers to stars. Here are some tips on creating your own unique shaped cards.
Instructions:
CREATING A SHAPE FOR YOUR CARD:First, people often wonder how to come up with a creative shape for a card. It is easier than it looks! In fact, there are several options.The simplest way is to just hand draw a shape. (Don’t worry, you don’t have to be a sketch artist to do this! Just give it a try.) Try starting with a Hero Arts note card. Draw the shape onto the note card with a pencil. By starting with the note card, you can be sure the final card fits nicely in the envelope. Cut along the line and you are good to go!.

Another option to make shaped cards is to first create something to trace. Try enlarging a clip art image on your computer to a size slightly smaller than the envelope. Print the shape and use it as a template for your card. Be sure to keep the template so you can use it again in the future. You can also trace shapes from around your house, such as a CD for a circle card.

If you are interested in simple ways of altering a regular note card to give it a new look, there are several things you can try. First, it can even be as basic as using a corner rounder to round the corners of a plain card. This results in a card with a soft, finished look. Another option is to cut the length of a note card down to the width of your envelope. (You will end up with a small, square card.) Create a stamped piece that hangs over the crease of the card. This is just a different option.

OPENING AND CLOSING OF THE CARD:

Even with a shaped card design, your card can still open and close like a regular card. There are a few ways you can make sure of this. One way is to keep the regular crease of the note card in tack. Start with a regular note card and draw or trace the shape onto it, leaving it hanging slightly off the creased edge. This way, when you cut it out, part of the crease will still be in tack so it still opens and closes like a card.

Another option is to cut two separate pieces, exactly the same shape. Then, you can join the front and back pieces with some sort of creative attachment. Try using a line of stitching, a few staples or eyelets. One fun option is to attach them with one brad so that the front can swing open to reveal the inside.

Finally, the easiest way to create a shaped card that opens and closes nicely also starts with two separate pieces cut exactly the same. At the top of the back piece, create a fold going backwards, approximately ¾” from the edge. Generously apply adhesive to the folded flap and line it up with the top piece. Allow to dry. This method allows the person to easily open the card and read your message inside.

And, remember, there are many variations to this technique of creating shaped cards. Be sure to try different substrates besides paper, such as fabric and clear note cards (available through Hero Arts). Have fun!

 

PaperCrafting 101

Paper Crafting 101- Creating shaped cards

Dear Fellow Crafters,

The following is a copy of a blog post from Hero Arts that is perfect for this subject. Please feel free to share: http://www.heroarts.com/learning/technique.cfm?techID=73

~Sallie

FLOWER CARD: Allow a shaped card to open and close by keeping part of the note card’s crease intact.

CIRCLE CARD: To create a quick circle card, trace a CD onto two pieces of cardstock and cut.

FOLDED CARD: Assemble a note card in a creative way. HEART CARD: Assemble card with one brad so that the front can swing open to reveal the inside.

More Resources
Tip: If you create a shape card that you like, be sure to trace it. Keep this “template” for making more in the future.

Suggested Materials:
Hero Arts note cards, brads and photo turns, pencil and stamps.

Technique Essentials #9 Shaped Cards
By Jennifer McGuireIlove making handmade cards. There is no greater joy than sending a card to a loved one. However, after a few years of sending cards, I was looking for a fun way to be a bit more creative than decorating a plain rectangle card. I started out by making a circle card and loved it! Before I knew it, I was creating cards in every shape, from hearts to flowers to stars. Here are some tips on creating your own unique shaped cards.

Instructions:
CREATING A SHAPE FOR YOUR CARD:

First, people often wonder how to come up with a creative shape for a card. It is easier than it looks! In fact, there are several options.

The simplest way is to just hand draw a shape. (Don’t worry, you don’t have to be a sketch artist to do this! Just give it a try.) Try starting with a Hero Arts note card. Draw the shape onto the note card with a pencil. By starting with the note card, you can be sure the final card fits nicely in the envelope. Cut along the line and you are good to go! (See the Flower Card example.)

Another option to make shaped cards is to first create something to trace. Try enlarging a clip art image on your computer to a size slightly smaller than the envelope. Print the shape and use it as a template for your card. Be sure to keep the template so you can use it again in the future. You can also trace shapes from around your house, such as a CD for a circle card, as was done with Circle Card example.

If you are interested in simple ways of altering a regular note card to give it a new look, there are several things you can try. First, it can even be as basic as using a corner rounder to round the corners of a plain card. This results in a card with a soft, finished look. Another option is to cut the length of a note card down to the width of your envelope. (You will end up with a small, square card.) Create a stamped piece that hangs over the crease of the card. This is just a different option… and unexpected! (See the Folded Card example.)

OPENING AND CLOSING OF THE CARD:

Even with a shaped card design, your card can still open and close like a regular card. There are a few ways you can make sure of this. One way is to keep the regular crease of the note card in tack. Start with a regular note card and draw or trace the shape onto it, leaving it hanging slightly off the creased edge. This way, when you cut it out, part of the crease will still be in tack so it still opens and closes like a card. (Again, see the Flower Card example.)

Another option is to cut two separate pieces, exactly the same shape. Then, you can join the front and back pieces with some sort of creative attachment. Try using a line of stitching, a few staples or eyelets. One fun option is to attach them with one brad so that the front can swing open to reveal the inside. (See the Heart Card example.)

Finally, the easiest way to create a shaped card that opens and closes nicely also starts with two separate pieces cut exactly the same. At the top of the back piece, create a fold going backwards, approximately ¾” from the edge. Generously apply adhesive to the folded flap and line it up with the top piece. Allow to dry. This method allows the person to easily open the card and read your message inside. (Again, see the Circle Card example.)

And, remember, there are many variations to this technique of creating shaped cards. Be sure to try different substrates besides paper, such as fabric and clear note cards (available through Hero Arts). Have fun!

See This Technique Applied